Babby’s First Workshop

In a star struck trance and physical pain from working on conferences all week, I am writing to you about the amazing day of writing goodness I had on Saturday, November 14th. I’m grateful I took a chance and went to the Boston Writing Workshop. I feel more equipped to query, to talk about my work, and to make my writing the best it can be. It’s no new revelation that a great premise takes work and refinement and even a bit of, dare I say it, marketing. But this post isn’t about that. It’s a retrospective on my experience at this marvelous workshop hosted by the inspiring Chuck Sambucino.

BOSWW1

Continue reading

Remember Who You Arc

joshua earle title

That pun was bad. But I’m not ready to sit in a corner and think about what I did. I ran into an interesting problem where one of the points of view in my tale hasn’t been very linear or defined. So how do you tie it together in a knot? Let me count a few ways.

Continue reading

Spooky Scary: On Adjectives, Adverbs, and Similes

Title page

I saw this tweet the other day that replaces all the adjectives in H.P. Lovecraft with the word “spooky.” I then saw another tweet that removed all the adjectives, adverbs, and similes altogether. Let’s do a quick exploration. It’s also October so talking about spooky things is totally in right now.

Continue reading

Red Shirts: Help, I Just Killed Thirty People in One Chapter

Your fantasy novel sucks if no one dies. There, I said it. Someone has to die for a story to be a great adventure. It can be as personal as The Hobbit or just a wanton massacre of side folks like A Song of Ice and Fire. Someone’s gotta die and I just got a little bit of literary trigger happiness and killed 30 in one chapter.

Continue reading

I Wrote a Synopsis

Ever read something and go, “What the heck was that about?” And then you go to Wikipedia and they have that nice section called “Plot.” When writing your own work, using Wikipedia as a refresher for key story events when you’re neck-deep in editing isn’t really an option. Unless you are one of those elusive published authors, in which case, I am jelly and good on you. So, guess who gets to write the synopsis…

Continue reading

From Third to First (Person)

I sincerely wanted to be a little avant-garde in my work. I wanted to blend first and third person and pretend it’s totally intentional and to sound like I knew what I was doing. But then, upon rereading, it made no sense. It made so little sense, in fact, that sense was being creating in other places of the world. And thus the undertaking started: translating most of my book from third person into first. I’m going to share my process mostly for the sake of my own accountability. Continue reading